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MYTHOLOGIES: Text-ures

EDITORIAL

Mythologies
1.1

Stories are told to each generation.  These stories are passed from father to son, pastor to partitioners, troubadours to the stationary, friend to friend, community to community.

Each contains a vision of the world.  Visions that share elements of truth and fiction.  Structural elements and characters have changed names, forms, and moralities.

There are many scholars, more studied that I, who have analyzed why culture developed mythology; and this is a blog, not a dissertation.

My understanding is that we develop mythologies to explain the world.  (Most) ancient Greeks did not believe that there was a literal person tossing lightening during a storm.  Zeus myths go towards explaining the world in which they lived.  These tales provided folks a way to rationalize their world, to create a culture.  Stories are told between people, and these shared stories make up the fundamental attributes of culture, and this should never be underestimated.



Hekate - research


Wood statuette of Hekate
Period: Hellenistic
Date: 304–30 B.C.
Culture: Egyptian, Ptolemaic
Medium: Wood, Juniper
Dimensions: H.: 9 3/16 in. (23.4 cm)
Classification: Miscellaneous-Wood
Source: Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York



Marble statuette of triple-bodied Hekate and the three Graces
Period: Late Hellenistic

Date: 1st–2nd century A.D.
Culture: Roman
Medium: Marble
Dimensions: H. 12 in. (30.5 cm)
Classification: Stone Sculpture
Source: Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York





Hekate, Goddess of Darkness, from the Goddesses of the Greeks and Romans series 
(N188) issued by Wm. S. Kimball & Co.
Publisher: Issued by William S. Kimball & Company
Lithographer: Lithography by Ketterlinus Lithography Company (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
Date:1889

Medium: Commercial color lithograph
Dimensions: Sheet: 2 3/4 × 1 1/2 in. (7 × 3.8 cm)
Classifications: Prints, Ephemera
Source: Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York





Hecate, or The Night of Enitharmon's Joy
Artist: William Blake
Year: 1795
Type: Pen and ink with watercolour on paper
Dimensions: 44 cm × 58 cm (17.32 in × 22.83 in)
Source: Tate Gallery, London